Fruits High In Iron

20 Fruits High In Iron (The Perfect Fruits For Anemia)

Getting enough iron each day can sometimes seem like a difficult task. Luckily, there are many fresh, natural foods that provide you with a lot of this mineral in a single serving, making it very easy to load up on iron as well as other nutrients.

The best way to get iron from your diet is to consume a lot of veggies, fruits, and animal protein. These foods are some of the best dietary sources of iron. 

If you don’t eat meat, make sure to include a lot of iron-rich plant-based foods in your diet, such as fruits. Luckily, there are many that contain a lot of this mineral.

Sometimes fruits aren’t rich in iron, and the iron they contain is non-heme, which is much harder for your body to absorb and metabolize. So, it’s important to consume these foods with a good source of other nutrients that aid in the absorption of iron.

Aside from iron, all of these fruits contain plenty of other nutrients that prevent diseases and improve digestion. So, they make for a wonderful addition to any balanced diet aimed at optimal health.

20 Fruits High in Iron

1. Figs

A ½-cup of figs contains 1.2 mg of iron, which is about 7% of your daily recommended need for this mineral. Figs are dried fruit, so they contain a good dose of iron in a single serving, which means that eating them can help prevent iron deficiency and even anemia.

On top of that, figs contain quite a good dose of vitamin C – a nutrient that helps your body absorb iron, especially non-heme iron.

Aside from that, figs are also rich in vitamin K, vitamin B6, calcium, magnesium, and copper. So, eating them can help you load up on these nutrients.

One downside, though, is that figs are high in sugar. So, make sure to consume them in moderation.

2. Dates

A half-cup serving of dates contains 1.5 mg of iron, which equals 8% of your daily need for this nutrient. Because of that, dates make for a great source of iron, especially when consumed, along with a good source of vitamin C.

On top of the iron, dates contain a good amount of fiber, vitamin B6, magnesium, potassium, copper, and selenium. So, eating them can help prevent any deficiencies of these minerals.

Dates are also very easy to incorporate into any diet. They can be added to salads, sauces, and desserts, improving the nutritional profile of these meals and adding to the health benefits even more.

3. Raisins

A ½-cup of raisins contains 1.6 mg of iron9% of your daily need for this mineral. Raisins are quite caloric, but they still make for a wonderful source of this important mineral, thus preventing iron deficiency and anemia.

Raisins also provide you with thiamin, riboflavin, vitamin B6, potassium, copper, and manganese. They also help you load up on lots of fiber, improving the health of your digestive system and feeding the ‘good’ gut bacteria in your stomach.

Studies also show that eating raisins reduces overall inflammation, improves intestinal function, and regulates the balance of bacteria in your gut.

Iron + Vitamin C at FutureKind.com

4. Prunes

A one-cup serving of prunes contains about 1.6 mg of iron, which corresponds to about 9% of your daily need for this mineral. Prune juice is an even better source of this mineral, providing you with as much as 3 mg of iron in one glass.

As a result, eating prunes and drinking prune juice can help prevent iron deficiency and anemia.

On top of that, prunes contain a lot of vitamin C and copper, which are two nutrients that aid in the absorption of iron and have also been known to prevent anemia on their own.

Aside from these wonderful benefits, prunes provide you with a good dose of vitamin K, vitamin B6, manganese, and potassium, which help with blood clotting, bone metabolism, and healthy blood pressure.

So, eating prunes helps with more than just the health of your cardiovascular system.

5. Pomegranate

One pomegranate fruit can provide you with as much as 1 mg of iron, which is 6% of your daily need for this mineral. It’s rather low in calories and high in fiber, so you can safely consume more and load up on even more iron than this amount, though.

In addition, pomegranate is a great source of vitamin C. So, the non-heme iron is absorbed much better than it would have been without this micronutrient.

Pomegranate also contains a lot of vitamin K, thiamin, folate, and pantothenic acid. It’s also loaded with minerals, such as phosphorus, potassium, copper, and manganese.

So, having some pomegranate or pomegranate juice from time to time is beneficial for you.

6. Apples

One large apple contains about 0.4 mg of iron. While this might not seem like a lot, apples are actually very beneficial for iron absorption, especially the non-heme one found in fruits and vegetables.

In fact, apples are also rich in vitamin C, which is wonderful for the health of your immune, digestive, and cardiovascular systems. This micronutrient also works together with iron to prevent anemia.

Other nutrients found in apples include fiber, vitamin K, potassium, vitamin B6, and manganese. So, this veggie makes for a wonderful addition to any diet.

7. Apricots

A one-cup serving of sliced apricots contains around 0.6 mg of iron. A glass of apricot nectar provides you with 1 mg of iron, and one cup of dried apricots contains as much as 2.4 mg of iron, which is 13% of your daily need for this mineral.

As a result, apricot in all its forms is a wonderful source of iron.

Iron + Vitamin C at FutureKind.com

What’s more, fresh apricots can help you load up on many other nutrients, such as fiber, vitamin C, potassium, copper, and vitamin E.

Some of these nutrients also aid in iron absorption and anemia prevention. Others help prevent various health issues and chronic diseases. So, eating apricots is very good for your overall health and wellbeing.

8. Raspberries

A one-cup serving of raw raspberries contains around 0.8 mg of iron, which is a very good amount considering that it comes with just about 64 calories. As a result, raspberries are a delicious source of iron.

Other raspberry-based products contain a good dose of iron too. For example, one cup of canned raspberries provides you with about 1.1 mg of iron, which equals 6% of your daily need for this mineral.

On top of that, eating raspberries can help you avoid deficiencies of the following nutrients: vitamin C, vitamin K, folate, manganese, and magnesium. Plus, they contain lots of antioxidants that help flush out free radicals from your body.

9. Mulberries

Mulberries are yet another type of berries that contain a good dose of iron. A single one-cup serving contains around 2.6 mg of iron14% of your daily need for this mineral. This is a very impressive amount, so snacking on this fruit can help prevent iron deficiency.

This berry also contains a lot of vitamin C, about 85% of your daily need in a one-cup serving. This vitamin helps your body absorb the non-heme iron found in fruits, such as in mulberries.

Plus, eating mulberries can help you load up on vitamin K, potassium, magnesium, and riboflavin.

So, make sure to include this fruit in your diet if you’re trying to up your intake of iron.

10. Watermelon

Eating watermelon can also help you reach your daily need for iron. One cup of watermelon balls contains 0.4 mg of iron. It’s a pretty good amount, especially since many people consume more watermelon than that in a single serving.

This fruit also provides you with vitamin C, which aids in the absorption of the iron that’s found in watermelon. So, eating watermelon can help prevent iron deficiency and anemia.

What’s more, according to studies, eating watermelon helps you stay hydrated, lower your risk of cancer, and relieve muscle soreness.

Plus, watermelon seeds are also rich in iron. A cup of watermelon seeds contains 2 mg of iron11% of your daily need. So, eating watermelon with seeds is good for you.

11. Strawberries

One cup of raw chopped strawberries contains 0.6 mg of iron. The same serving of canned strawberries provides you with 1.2 mg of iron. So, most strawberry-based foods and beverages can help you avoid iron deficiency.

This type of berry also contains vitamin C, folate, manganese, and potassium. Also, studies show that eating strawberries can help protect your heart, increase the levels of ‘good’ cholesterol, and protect you against cancer.

Strawberries are also rich in antioxidants – plant compounds that help prevent various chronic conditions like heart disease, type 2 diabetes, and cancer.

12. Currants

Just one cup of currants contains 1.1 mg of iron6% of your daily requirement. Currants make for a very good source of iron, and they also improve the absorption of this mineral. 

Currants, both red and white, also provide you with a lot of vitamin K, manganese, potassium, and copper. Research also shows that eating currants supports a healthy immune system, helps with muscle contractions, and keeps your bones healthy.

Dried currants are even higher in iron. For example, a ½-cup serving contains 2.4 mg of iron13% of your daily need. So, just like all other dried fruits, dried currants are an excellent food to consume to avoid iron deficiency.

13. Blackberries

One cup of blackberries provides you with 0.9 mg of iron, about 5% of your daily need for this mineral. On the other hand, one glass of blackberry juice contains 1.2 mg of iron. So, all blackberry-based foods and beverages are a good source of this essential mineral.

Blackberries also contain good amounts of vitamins C, E, and K, niacin, magnesium, copper, and manganese. All of these minerals are important for good health and disease prevention. So, make sure to include foods containing them in your diet as often as possible.

In addition, eating blackberries can help you load up on fiber, improving your digestive system and feeding the ‘good’ gut bacteria in your stomach. 

14. Bananas

One cup of mashed bananas contains 0.6 mg of iron. While this isn’t a very high amount, the vitamin C found in bananas helps ensure that all the non-heme iron is absorbed by your body.

Banana chips are also capable of providing you with a good dose of iron. In fact, a three-ounce serving of banana chips contains 1.1 mg of iron, which equals 6% of your daily requirement for this mineral.

Aside from that, bananas are rich in magnesium, vitamin B6, fiber, manganese, and potassium. Eating them also helps you get a lot of antioxidants, which reduce your risk of chronic health conditions.

15. Oranges

One cup of orange sections contains 0.2 mg of iron. This doesn’t necessarily mean that oranges aren’t a good source of this mineral, though.

In fact, studies show that foods rich in vitamin C – and this serving contains more than your whole need for this mineral – improve iron absorption more than other nutrients and foods. So, eating oranges is incredibly good for maintaining high iron levels.

In addition to that, oranges contain a lot of fiber, thiamin, folate, calcium, and potassium. All of these nutrients contribute to various bodily processes and help keep you healthy. So, eating oranges is very beneficial.

Fresh orange juice is slightly higher in iron, containing 0.5 mg of iron per single cup.

16. Grapefruit

Grapefruit might not be the best source of iron, but it does contain other nutrients that help with the absorption of this mineral. One cup of grapefruit sections contains just 0.2 mg of iron.

But on the other hand, it does contain a lot of vitamin C, folate, and copper – three nutrients that help with the absorption of iron.

Because of that, eating grapefruit can help you avoid iron deficiency and anemia.

In addition, grapefruit is an excellent source of fiber, riboflavin, potassium, and calcium. So, you can get a lot more from eating grapefruit than just a reduced risk of iron deficiency. 

17. Kiwi

A one-cup serving of kiwi slices contains 0.5 mg of iron. This fruit is also very rich in vitamin C, which ensures that all the iron is absorbed.

Other nutrients that eating kiwi will provide you with are vitamin E, vitamin K, folate, potassium, and copper. This fruit also contains lots of antioxidants, which reduce your risk of chronic conditions and inflammation.

Studies also show that eating kiwis can reduce your risk of strokes and heart diseases as well as improve the levels of ‘good’ cholesterol in your blood.

18. Olives

Three tablespoons of green olives contain 1 mg of iron6% of your daily need for this mineral. Some other varieties of black olives contain a lot more iron, though, so it’s important to check the nutritional value before making the purchase.

In addition to iron, olives are a good source of fiber and antioxidants as well as healthy fats that improve the health of your gastrointestinal and cardiovascular systems.

Eating olives has also been shown to reduce your risk of osteoporosis and cancer. So, including them in your diet is very beneficial.

19. Melons

Depending on the variety, one cup of melon balls can provide you with anywhere between 0.2 mg to 0.6 mg of iron. This fruit is also high in vitamin C, so the non-heme iron is easier for your digestive system to absorb.

Additionally, melons contain a good amount of fiber, vitamin A, folate, magnesium, and potassium. So, eating this large fruit can keep your eyes healthy, boost your immune system, and lower your blood pressure.

As a result, melons make for a great, healthy snack.

20. Peaches

One large peach contains 0.4 mg of iron. It also contains a lot of vitamin C that ensures that all the iron is absorbed. So, eating peaches can help with iron deficiency and anemia symptoms.

What’s more, eating peaches can help you load up on potassium, copper, vitamin A, and niacin. These nutrients are very important for good health, so it’s a good idea to eat foods rich in them.

Other peach-containing foods and beverages also contain good amounts of iron. For example, one cup of peach nectar contains 0.5 mg of iron. Plus, a ½-cup serving of dried peaches provides you with 1.7 mg of iron 10% of your daily need.

So, choosing dried peaches is a great way to increase your daily intake of iron as well as other nutrients.

Conclusion

There are many fruits that you can include in an iron-rich diet that help you load up on this mineral. These fruits can reduce your risk of iron deficiency and anemia and prevent various symptoms of lacking enough iron.

In addition, these fruits are rich in fiber, vitamins, minerals, and lots of antioxidants that help improve your health and lower your risk of diseases.

So, eating these foods is great for you, not just for the iron content.

Sources: Nutrition Data, National Library of Medicine, PMC, and Research Gate