Is Oatmeal High In Iron?

Is Oatmeal High In Iron? (Quick Read)

Iron is one of the most important minerals that your body needs. It helps preserve many vital functions in your body, such as body temperature regulation, immune system control, and gastrointestinal processed. It even helps treat anemia and keep your red blood cells healthy.

Because of that, having enough iron in your diet is incredibly important, so you should make sure to eat iron-rich foods, especially for breakfast.

One of the most popular breakfast foods around the world is oatmeal. But is oatmeal high in iron?

Is Oatmeal High In Iron?

Oatmeal is an excellent source of iron because one cup of oatmeal contains 77% of recommended daily intake of iron for women and an incredible 173% of iron for men.

Oatmeal is also rich in other essential nutrients like protein, fiber, vitamin B6, magnesium, and calcium.

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How much iron is in oatmeal?

One cup (8 oz/234 g) of cooked oatmeal has 13.9 mg of iron. That’s an incredible amount that will supply you with 77% (women) and 173% (men) of RDA.

That can further be boosted by adding nuts high in iron, or some dried fruits such as dates, prunes, or raisins.

Generally, foods that contain more than 2mg of iron per single serving are considered a good source of this mineral. On the other hand, foods with 3.5mg of iron or more are very good sources of this nutrient.

Because of that, aside from seafood and meat, oats are an iron-rich food that helps you load up on this nutrient, especially if you’re following a vegetarian or vegan diet.

Nutritional Facts: Oatmeal (3.5 oz/100 g)

  • 68 Calories
  • Total Fat 1.4 g
  • Sodium 49 mg
  • Total Carbohydrate 12 g
    • Dietary fiber 1.7 g
    • Sugar 0.5 g
  • Potassium 61 mg 1% DV
  • Protein 2.4 g
  • Vitamin C 0% DV
  • Calcium 8% DV
  • Iron 33-75% DV
  • Vitamin B6 15% DV
  • Magnesium 6% DV

Generally, foods that contain more than 2mg of iron per single serving are considered a good source of this mineral. On the other hand, foods with 3.5mg of iron or more are very good sources of this nutrient.

Oatmeal can certainly help you boost your iron intake, especially if you’re following a vegetarian or vegan diet.

Make sure to also read Top 20 Vegetables High In Iron, Top 10 Drinks High In Iron, as well as Top 10 Iron-Rich Fish List.

Why is oatmeal healthy?

Oats and oatmeal are considered to be some of the healthiest foods on earth. Because they’re extremely nutritious and contain fiber and complex carbs, eating them won’t cause spikes in your blood sugar levels.

Full of fiber

Fiber is good for feeding good gut bacteria and for preventing many digestive problems, including acid reflux.

Iron + Vitamin C at FutureKind.com

Complex carbohydrates

Oatmeal also has complex carbohydrates that help your body slowly release energy from them, thus preventing the feeling of lethargy.

Opposed to simple carbs, complex carbohydrates are also less probable to induce weight gain, but also curb your appetite, and control how much food you’re eating.

Complex carbs also don’t lead to insulin resistance, which can lead to the development of diabetes as well as problems with treating it.

Rich in manganese

We also know that oatmeal is especially high in manganese, and provides you with 68% of your daily need for this mineral in just one serving.

Manganese can, in combination with other nutrients, help enhance bone health and act as a powerful antioxidant.

It can also help reduce the risk of many health conditions driven by oxidative stress. Apart from that, manganese can also help reduce inflammation in your digestive system and lead to better digestion and a faster metabolism.

Low in calories

Oatmeal can help you lose weight in a healthy and steady way. It’s relatively low in calories, and the fiber it contains increases your sensation of fullness, which discourages overeating.

Eating oatmeal has also been proven to boost the release of a special satiety hormone and leading to a reduced calorie intake and lower risk of obesity.

Has anti-inflammatory properties

Another way eating oatmeal can help you is by reducing the risk of childhood asthma. Due to its anti-inflammatory properties, consuming oatmeal can protect your airways from asthma as well as contribute to reducing inflammation in the rest of your body.

While this research applies mostly to children, eating oats may actually help you reduce adult asthma symptoms as well.

The recommended daily intake of iron for adult women is 18 mg. For adult men, that’s only 8 mg. See more in the chart below.

Can you take in too much iron from oatmeal?

Oatmeal, and especially fortified oatmeal, does have a considerable amount of iron, however, it’s difficult to overeat on oats because they’re very fulfilling and you’d probably have to eat dozens of ounces regularly for it to become an issue.

Iron is extremely important for our health and various bodily processes. The health advantages of iron are often overlooked until you become iron deficient, so it’s significant not to let that happen.

It’s also hard to take in too much iron in general as this mineral is needed for many metabolic processes, and you’d need to only consume high-iron food for this to become a problem.

Iron + Vitamin C at FutureKind.com

The typical way people develop Hemochromatosis is by taking too many supplements. Taking in too much iron from diet usually isn’t the problem.

When that happens, you can develop various symptoms, including nausea, vomiting, and stomach pain, especially if you don’t take the supplements with food.

As a result, it’s best to get all your essential nutrients from a healthy, balanced diet and only reach for supplements when it’s absolutely necessary.

Does oatmeal block iron absorption?

Some studies suggest that oats and oat products affect the absorption of non-heme iron in people. It’s because oats have a high phytate content.

However, if you’re a healthy adult who doesn’t have iron deficiency, iron absorption shouldn’t concern you much as long as you’re eating a varied diet of iron-rich foods.

Do Quaker Oats contain iron?

All Quaker Oats products are high in iron, either naturally or because they’re fortified. However, some Quaker products are higher in iron than others.

For instance, Quaker Fruit and Cream Variety (12.1 mg/3.5 oz) are the highest in iron while Quaker MultiGrain Oatmeal (3 mg/3.5 oz) is one of the lowest, yet still rather high as well.

Is oatmeal prepared with milk higher in iron?

Milk contains very little iron unless it’s fortified or has added nutrients. Because of that, it doesn’t matter whether you use water or milk to prepare your oatmeal.

The only difference adding milk makes is adding all the other vitamins that it contains, such as calcium, vitamin D, riboflavin, and phosphorus. Milk also adds flavor to oatmeal without adding too many extra calories.

Aside from adding other vitamins and minerals, preparing your oatmeal with milk, especially the plant-based ones, may help you reap excellent health benefits from the plant compounds that these types of milk contain.

Plant proteins and substances have different nutritional profiles to animal protein. Because of that, including a mix of these two in your diet is the healthiest choice to ensure you’re consuming as many beneficial nutrients as possible.

Oatmeal is a good source of iron as it contains more than 2mg of this mineral in a single serving. It’s also rich in other essential nutrients, minerals, and vitamins that help keep your whole body healthy and prevent the development of various health conditions—because of that, eating oatmeal for breakfast or any other meal of the day can help you reap various health benefits.

Recommended intakes for iron

Your recommended daily intake of iron depends on your age and sex. It was developed by the Food and Nutrition Board (FNB) at the Institute of Medicine (IOM) of the National Academies.

RDAs for Iron
AgeMaleFemalePregnancyLactation
0-6 months0.27 mg0.27 mg
7-12 months11 mg11 mg
1-3 years7 mg7 mg
4-8 years10 mg10 mg
9-13 years8 mg8 mg
14-18 years11 mg15 mg27 mg10 mg
19-50 years8 mg18 mg27 mg9 mg
51+ years8 mg8 mg
RDAs for nonvegetarians. The RDAs for vegetarians are 1.8 times higher than for people who eat meat.

Iron is one of the most important minerals that our body needs. It helps maintain vital functions in our body, such as body temperature regulation, immune system control, and gastrointestinal processes. It even helps treat anemia and keep our red blood cells healthy.

Because of that, having enough iron in your diet is incredibly important, so you should make sure to eat iron-rich foods, especially for breakfast.

Conclusion

Oatmeal is a good source of iron and many commercially available oats and instant oatmeal have plenty of this mineral in a single serving.

Oatmeal is also high in other fundamental nutrients, minerals, and vitamins that help keep your body and mind healthy and avert the development of diverse health conditions.

Make sure to also read Top 20 Vegetables High In Iron, Top 10 Drinks High In Iron, as well as Top 10 Iron-Rich Fish List.

Source: USDA