Seafood High in Iron

15 Types of Seafood High in Iron (Load Up On Iron)

If you follow a healthy, varied diet, it’s very easy to get enough iron every day. Most foods that you consume daily contain decent amounts of this mineral in a single serving. So, you’re very unlikely to develop iron deficiency and anemia.

Some of the best dietary sources of iron include animal-based products, such as poultry, beef, and pork, and, of course, seafood. So, if your diet allows these foods, you are in luck.

But not all seafood is as high in iron as other types. So, let’s take a look at some of the seafood types that are the highest in this mineral.

All types of seafood are high in iron, but some of them pack a lot more of this mineral than others. So, if you’re trying to prevent anemia or treat the symptoms of iron deficiency, choosing this iron-rich seafood is a great choice.

What’s more, seafood is very rich in nutrients, such as protein, vitamin B12, and folate, among others. These three nutrients are excellent at helping with anemia prevention.

So, you’re more likely to get more out of these seafood types than just iron.

So, here are 15 seafood types that are the richest in iron.

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15 Types of Seafood High in Iron

1. Oysters

A three-ounce (85 grams) serving of oysters contains around 7.8 mg of iron, which equals 43% of your daily need for this mineral. This is wonderful, especially since it comes with only 139 calories.

Oysters are very easy to prepare, rich in protein, and low in fat. They also contain lots of vitamin C, riboflavin, niacin, and vitamin B12. In addition, oysters provide you with lots of minerals, such as phosphorus, zinc, copper, manganese, and selenium.

So, eating oysters can help you load up on other minerals, not just iron.

2. Shrimp

A three-ounce (85 grams) of shrimp cooked using moist heat contains 2.6 mg of iron, around 15% of your daily requirement. Because of that, shrimp is yet another great food choice for people trying to increase their intake of iron.

Shrimp is much lower in calories than other seafood types, providing only 84 calories in one serving. It’s also rich in niacin, vitamin B12, phosphorus, and selenium.

Shrimp can be consumed as a main dish, part of a salad, and even as a topping for sandwiches. So, it’s very easy to incorporate this type of crustacean into your diet.

3. Haddock

A haddock fillet (150 grams) contains around 2 mg of iron, about 11% of your daily requirement for this mineral. It’s a very filling fish, as it’s loaded with protein and healthy fats that curb your appetite and increase the feeling of fullness after eating.

Iron + Vitamin C at FutureKind.com

The healthy fats found in this type of fish support healthy cells, boost energy levels, and improve the health of your brain. Haddock also contains a lot of niacin, vitamin B6, potassium, and magnesium, among other nutrients.

4. Mackerel

A one-cup serving (190 g) of canned mackerel provides you with 3.9 mg of iron, which corresponds to 22% of how much of this mineral you need each day. It’s a pretty good amount, considering the nutrients you’re getting from this type of fish.

Mackerel is a fatty fish that contains lots of healthy fats. These fatty acids help protect your heart from damage and boost brain health. 

Mackerel also contains some of all minerals your body needs, a lot of vitamins A, D, E, and B12, niacin, and riboflavin.

5. Sardines

One cup of drained canned sardines (149 grams) contains 4.4 mg of iron. This is around 24% of your daily need for this mineral, which means that eating this fish can definitely reduce your risk of iron deficiency.

Sardines also contain other minerals like calcium, selenium, phosphorus, magnesium, and copper. It also provides you with a good dose of vitamin D, vitamin B12, and niacin.

When eating sardines, choose the ones canned in oil and not in tomato sauce. That way, you’ll consume less dietary sodium, which can raise your blood pressure and increase your risk of strokes.

6. Anchovies

One can (45 grams) of anchovies contains 2.1 mg of ironaround 12% of your need for this mineral

Since this serving is much smaller than some other types of seafood, anchovies can make for a better source of iron than some other seafood.

Anchovies also contain a lot of niacin, calcium, selenium, and phosphorus.

One downside is that anchovies contain a lot of sodium, around 69% of your daily need for this mineral in a single serving. Too much sodium can raise your blood pressure and increase your risk of strokes.

So, be careful with consuming too many anchovies in a single serving.

7. Crab 

Three ounces (85 grams) of queen crab cooked using moist heat contains 2.4 mg of iron, which equals 14% of your daily need

Some other types of crab might be lower in iron, though. So, make sure to choose queen crab if your goal is to increase your intake of this mineral.

Iron + Vitamin C at FutureKind.com

Crab is also a good source of protein, vitamin B12, selenium, copper, and zinc. Unfortunately, this type of seafood is also high in sodium. So, make sure not to consume it too often and in too large quantities.

8. Scallops

A three-ounce (85 grams) of steamed scallops provides you with 2.4 mg of iron, which is about 25% of your daily need for this nutrient. Scallops are very low in calories, so this amount of iron is pretty impressive.

In addition, scallops contain a lot of selenium, phosphorus, and magnesium, which are all nutrients that support good bone health. 

Selenium also works as a powerful antioxidant, so eating scallops can reduce your risk of various chronic conditions.

9. Clams

A three-ounce (85 grams) serving contains 23.8 mg of iron132% of your daily requirement for this mineral. This makes clams the best source of dietary iron among all types of seafood. 

Because of that, eating clams can help you load up on iron, preventing iron deficiency and anemia.

Claims are also rich in protein, vitamin C, vitamin B12, riboflavin, phosphorus, copper, and manganese. Studies also show that eating clams can benefit male fertility and improve collagen synthesis.

10. Halibut

One small fillet (159 grams) of halibut contains 1.7 mg of iron, about 9% of your daily requirement. This is a good amount considering the calories, especially since halibut is an oily fish.

In addition, halibut contains a good amount of protein, healthy fats, B vitamins, magnesium, potassium, and selenium.

So, including it in your diet can be very beneficial.

11. Tuna

One cup (146 grams) of tuna canned in oil contains 2 mg of iron. This corresponds to 11% of your daily need for this mineral. It’s a very good amount, which means that eating tuna can help prevent iron deficiency.

Tuna also contains protein, vitamin D, vitamin K, niacin, phosphorus, and selenium. So, eating tuna can help prevent the deficiency of many more nutrients than just iron.

12. Herring

One herring fillet (143 grams) provides you with 2 mg of iron11% of how much you need per day. Herring is one of the oily fish that contains a lot of iron per single serving. So, eating it is a good idea for preventing iron deficiency.

Moreover, herring is an excellent source of all B vitamins, vitamin E, phosphorus, selenium, and potassium. It’s also rich in protein, so it can help you build muscle.

13. Salmon

One fillet (154 grams) of salmon contains 1.6 mg of iron. This is around 9% of how much you need per day

Salmon is slightly lower in iron than some other types of seafood, but it’s still a good fish to include in an iron-rich diet.

Salmon is also a fatty fish, which means that it contains a lot of omega-3 fatty acids. These help prevent various health issues, including heart disease.

Eating salmon can also help you load up on protein, B vitamins, selenium, phosphorus, magnesium, and potassium.

14. Perch

One large perch fillet (101 grams) contains around 1.2 mg of iron, around 6% of your daily need for this mineral.

This fish also contains a lot of protein, which means that eating it helps you build muscles and prevent overeating. Including perch in your diet also helps you get enough vitamin B12, phosphorus, and selenium.

15. Trout

One large trout fillet (93 grams) contains 1.8 mg of iron11% of your daily need for this mineral. Trout is a white fish, so it’s very low in calories. Because of that, this amount is pretty impressive.

On top of that, trout is very high in protein, vitamin B12, phosphorus, and manganese, among others. It also contains a good dose of omega-3 fatty acids, which help protect your heart from damage.

Conclusion

There is lots of seafood that pack an incredibly good dose of iron. So, eating them can help you load up on this mineral, preventing iron deficiency and anemia.

Seafood is also an excellent source of protein, B vitamins, omega-3 fatty acids, magnesium, selenium, potassium, and other nutrients.

As a result, eating seafood is a great thing for your health.

Sources: Nutrition Data, National Library of Medicine, PMC, and Research Gate