Top Vegetables High In Iron

Top 20 Vegetables High In Iron (Boost Your Intake)

Iron is a crucial mineral that many people don’t get enough from their foods. It helps boost your immune system, treat anemia, and even control your general energy levels and focus.

 The benefits of iron are often unnoticed until a person has developed a deficiency, so it’s important to prevent that from happening. 

Luckily, many foods high in iron, including veggies, are delicious and easy to add to any diet.

20 Vegetables High In Iron

1. Spinach

One cup of cooked spinach provides you with 6.4 mg of iron

One cup of cooked spinach provides you with 6.4 mg of iron. Because of that, spinach is one of the best sources of this important mineral. 

It also contains micronutrients, such as vitamin A, vitamin K, folate, manganese, and magnesium. 

It’s also a great source of vitamin C, which is a powerful antioxidant that helps with iron absorption. 

Eating spinach can also help boost your immune system, helping your body fight against viruses and bacteria.

2. Sun-dried tomatoes

A one-cup serving of dried tomatoes contains 4.9 mg of iron. This is the only type of tomato that contains a good dose of iron, so it might be a good idea to include it in your diet.

Sun-dried tomatoes are rich in various vitamins and minerals as well as antioxidants. 

These compounds help flush out harmful free radicals from your body, preventing oxidative stress and damage to your cells.

3. Yellow string beans

One cup of cooked yellow string beans contains 4.4 mg of iron

One cup of cooked yellow string beans contains 4.4 mg of iron. They are delicious and easy to add to any diet as a side dish or even on their own. 

Yellow string beans contain special plant compounds that improve your heart health, reduce your risk of cancer, and even help control your appetite. 

They’re also rich in various nutrients, including thiamin, folate, magnesium, phosphorus, and a lot of protein.

4. Swiss Chard

One cup of chopped raw Swiss chard provides you with 4 mg of iron. This leafy green works great as a side dish for dinner and is loaded with minerals, including magnesium, potassium, manganese, and copper. 

Swiss chard also contains a lot of vitamin C, which helps in the absorption of non-heme iron that it contains. 

Iron + Vitamin C at FutureKind.com

Eating Swiss chard can also improve the health of your heart, lungs, and kidneys by protecting them from free radicals.

Need to boost your iron intake? Read the Top 10 Drinks High In Iron (Iron-Rich Drinks) article.

5. Beet greens

One cup of cooked beet greens contains 2.7 mg of iron

One cup of cooked beet greens contains 2.7 mg of iron. These delicious leaves are very nutritious and, aside from iron, contain a lot of vitamin K, manganese, and calcium. 

Beet greens contain no saturated fat and cholesterol, which makes them safe for your heart and cardiovascular system as a whole. 

They also improve blood health and may help treat anemia due to all the compounds and nutrients they contain.

6. Collards

One cup of cooked collards contains 2.2 mg of iron. Aside from iron, collards contain a lot of vitamin A and C, both of which help boost your immune system. 

Vitamin C is also a powerful antioxidant, which helps reduce your risk of several chronic conditions, including various types of cancer. 

Eating collards may also improve cholesterol levels and help strengthen your bones.

7. Peas

One cup of raw green peas provides you with 2.1 mg of iron

One cup of raw green peas provides you with 2.1 mg of iron. Peas are not only a great source of iron but also potassium. 

This mineral helps lower your blood pressure, preventing heart attacks and strokes. This mineral also helps keep your electrolyte levels in check and offset the negative effects of sodium on your health. 

Peas are also high in antioxidants, which reduce inflammation in your body.

8. Oyster mushrooms

One large oyster mushroom provides you with 2 mg of iron. This type of mushroom is highly nutritious and may promote heart and immune system health. 

Oyster mushrooms also contain antioxidants and various anti-inflammatory compounds that keep your digestive system healthy. 

They also contain a good dose of fiber, which might help reduce the symptoms of acid reflux and GERD.

9. Dandelion greens

One cup of cooked dandelion greens provides you with 1.9 mg of iron
Iron + Vitamin C at FutureKind.com

One cup of cooked dandelion greens provides you with 1.9 mg of iron. This leafy green is very high in nutrients and contains potent antioxidants. 

Eating dandelion greens can also help you manage your blood sugar levels, reduce cholesterol levels, and lower your blood pressure. 

Dandelion greens also contain a lot of vitamin A, vitamin K, vitamin C, and manganese, helping you up your intake of these micronutrients.

10. Brussels sprouts

A one-cup serving of cooked Brussels sprouts contains around 1.8 mg of iron. Brussels sprouts are healthy and tasty, making it easy to incorporate them into your diet. 

They also contain compounds that have anti-cancer properties, lowering your risk of several types of cancer. 

Brussels sprouts also provide you with a good dose of antioxidants that may support heart and gut health. 

In addition, eating them may prevent acid reflux symptoms, such as heartburn.

11. Asparagus

A cup of cooked asparagus contains 1.6 mg of iron

A cup of cooked asparagus contains 1.6 mg of iron. Asparagus is a good source of iron, fiber, and other plant compounds. 

This veggie is very beneficial for your digestive system’s health and your kidneys. 

It’s primarily made of water, which helps with hydration and helps flush out harmful substances from your digestive tract. 

Asparagus is also loaded with vitamin K, folate, and vitamin A.

12. Beets

A one-cup serving of cooked beets contains 1.4 mg of iron. Like beet greens, this root vegetable is high in fiber that helps soak up excess stomach acid and aids in digestion. 

It also contains a lot of vitamin A, vitamin K, riboflavin, magnesium, and potassium. These minerals and vitamins help boost your immune system and control blood pressure, which reduces your risk of strokes and heart attacks.

13. Pumpkin

One cup of cooked pumpkin contains 1.4 mg of iron

One cup of cooked pumpkin contains 1.4 mg of iron. Pumpkin can be eaten as a snack, added to various dishes, and even used to make soups. 

It contains a lot of powerful antioxidants as well as more than your daily recommended need for vitamin A. 

What’s more, pumpkin seeds are an even better source of iron, so tossing them into your salad can help you get even more of this essential mineral

14. Sweet potatoes

One large baked sweet potato contains 1.2 mg of iron. Sweet potatoes are a healthier alternative to traditional white potatoes, as they contain a lot more fiber and nutrients. 

They’re often baked in foil with herbs, making for a great side dish. They’re loaded with vitamin A, vitamin B6, magnesium, and potassium, which all contribute to cardiovascular health. 

Because of that, adding sweet potatoes to your diet can help lower your risk of high blood pressure, heart attacks, and strokes.

15. Kale

Kale On A Wooden Chopping Board
Kale On A Wooden Chopping Board

A one-cup serving of cooked kale contains 1.2 mg of iron. Often considered a superfood, kale contains a lot of vitamin A, which is very important for eye and bone health. 

It also contains omega-3 fatty acids, which have various benefits for your heart. Kale can be added to salads but also smoothies, making it easier for you to reach your daily nutritional needs. 

In addition to iron, kale is also rich in vitamin K, vitamin C, potassium, and manganese.

16. Red potatoes

Are potatoes healthy?

One medium-sized baked red potato contains 1.2 mg of iron. While they’re not as high in iron as sweet potatoes, red potatoes are still a decent source of this mineral. 

They’re also a great source of several B vitamins, such as vitamin B6, niacin, and folate. 

Sweet potatoes contain a lot of fiber in a single serving, which helps soak up excess stomach acid as well as feed the ‘good’ gut bacteria. This ensures good digestive system health and improved digestion.

17. Leeks

One cup of boiled leeks contains 1.2 mg of iron. While not many people cook with them, leeks are incredibly nutritious yet low in calories. 

Eating them may improve your digestion, promote weight loss, reduce inflammation, fight heart disease, and combat cancer. 

They’re also high in fiber and plant compounds that lower your blood sugar levels, preventing the development of type 2 diabetes.  

18. Turnip greens

One cup of cooked turnip greens contains 1.2 mg of iron. The leaves of this delicious root veggie have various benefits ranging from skin and hair health to cancer prevention. 

Turnip greens contain a good dose of vitamin A, vitamin C, vitamin K, and folate. They’re also rich in antioxidants that help flush out harmful radicals from your body, prevent oxidative stress, and reduce inflammation.

19. Red cabbage

One cup of cooked red cabbage contains 1.1 mg of iron

One cup of cooked red cabbage contains 1.1 mg of iron. Cabbage is a very versatile veggie that can be added to various meals. 

Red cabbage is especially high in iron as well as in vitamin C, vitamin K, and potassium. It’s also high in fiber, which improves digestion and helps food pass through your intestines.

20. Broccoli

One cup of cooked broccoli contains 1 mg of iron. While broccoli doesn’t contain as much iron as other veggies on this list, it’s a great source of this mineral as well as protein and fiber. 

Eating broccoli is very good for your heart health and may boost your immune system, which is especially beneficial during flu season and colder months.