20 Vegetables High In Iron (The Ultimate List)

20 Vegetables High In Iron (The Ultimate List)

Including plenty of iron-rich foods in your diet is incredibly beneficial for good health and disease prevention. In fact, one of the most important minerals many people might develop a deficiency of is iron.

As a result, make sure to choose a lot of healthy and fresh food sources of this mineral and add them to your diet as often as possible.

The best way to load up on iron is to consume heme iron, which is found in animal-derived products. But getting your iron from plant-based foods is still a good idea.

So, adding iron-rich veggies to your diet is a brilliant idea.

The highest vegetables in iron include cruciferous vegetables, such as broccoli, brussels sprouts, and cabbage. But there are many others than provide you with a good dose of this mineral.

Aside from iron, vegetables are a great source of fiber, antioxidants, vitamins, and minerals. All of these nutrients and plant compounds are essential for good health and well-being, reducing your risk of various health problems.

Most vegetables contain some iron, but it’s generally not a very large quantity. 

Luckily, the 20 veggies mentioned below are much higher in iron, which means eating them can help you prevent iron deficiency and anemia.

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20 Vegetables High in Iron

1. Broccoli

Broccoli
Broccoli

One cup of cooked broccoli contains about 1 mg of iron, and one cup of raw broccoli contains 0.7 mg of iron. In fact, broccoli is one of the veggies with the highest iron content.

Broccoli also contains a lot of fiber, quite some protein, and plenty of vitamins and minerals. These include vitamin C, vitamin K, folate, manganese, and potassium.

Since broccoli contains a lot of vitamin C, eating it ensures that your body absorbs as much of the non-heme iron found in this veggie as possible.

Broccoli is also rich in various antioxidants that help prevent chronic conditions, including cancer, diabetes, and heart disease.

So, eating broccoli is a great idea, not just for its iron content.

2. Potatoes

One medium-sized baked potato contains about 1.9 mg of iron. This is a very good amount considering the calories, which makes potatoes a very good source of this mineral.

Iron + Vitamin C at FutureKind.com

Just like broccoli, potatoes contain a lot of vitamin C – a nutrient that helps with the absorption of iron

So, your body will absorb the non-heme iron much better than it would have without the vitamin C present.

What’s more, potatoes are rich in other nutrients, especially fiber. Because of that, eating baked potatoes, especially with the skin on, can help improve your digestion, prevent weight gain, and feed the ‘good’ gut bacteria in your stomach.

Aside from that, potatoes also help you load up on vitamin B6, niacin, folate, potassium, and manganese, among other micronutrients.

So, be sure to include them in your diet.

3. Sweet potatoes

Sweet potatoes
One serving of sweet potato baked with the skin on contains 1.2 mg of iron

Like regular potatoes, sweet potatoes are also rich in iron. One serving of sweet potato baked with the skin on contains 1.2 mg of iron, about 7% of your daily need for this nutrient. So, eating sweet potatoes is another great way to load up on this essential mineral.

The vitamin C found in sweet potatoes helps with the absorption of non-heme iron as well. So, your body is unlikely to flush out large quantities of iron without absorbing them first.

In addition, sweet potatoes contain a lot of vitamin A, vitamin B6, pantothenic acid, magnesium, copper, and many other nutrients. They’re also rich in antioxidants that help keep you healthy.

So, they make for a delicious addition to a healthy, varied diet.

4. Brussels sprouts

A one-cup serving of cooked brussels sprouts contains about 1.8 mg of iron10% of your daily need

The same serving of raw brussels sprouts provides about 1.2 mg of iron. So, eating both cooked and raw brussels sprouts can help you load up on iron in an impressive way.

This veggie also contains vitamin C, which helps with iron absorption. It’s also a good source of folate and copper – two nutrients that contribute to the prevention of anemia. So, eating this vegetable is a very good idea for the health of your cardiovascular system.

Aside from that, brussels sprouts contain a lot of fiber, vitamin K, vitamin A, phosphorus, and magnesium.

As a result, eating them can help prevent the deficiencies of these minerals, among other problems.

5. Tomato

Tomatoes and garlic cloves
Tomatoes and garlic cloves
Iron + Vitamin C at FutureKind.com

Even though they might be classified as fruits, tomatoes are very rich in iron and mostly served as veggies, which earns them a place on this list. One cup of chopped tomatoes contains around 0.5 mg of iron.

On the other hand, one cup of cooked tomatoes provides you with 1.6 mg of iron, which corresponds to 9% of your daily need for this nutrient. So, tomatoes make for a very good source of this mineral, especially considering the calories.

Tomatoes are also rich in vitamin C, fiber, vitamin A, potassium, and manganese. They also contain powerful antioxidants, such as lycopene, that lower your risk of certain types of cancer.

Sun-dried tomatoes are especially high in iron, providing you with 2.5 mg of iron in a ½-cup serving

But remember that all dried fruits and veggies also contain a lot of calories from sugar. So, it’s important not to consume too many of them.

What’s more, other tomato-based products are high in iron too. For example, tomato juice contains 1 mg of iron in a one-cup serving, and one cup of tomato soup provides you with 2.6 mg of iron.

6. String beans

String Beans
String beans are a great source of iron and vitamin C

One cup of cooked snap beans contains around 0.8 mg of iron5% of your daily need. This amount comes with just 44 calories, so snap beans make for a great source of this nutrient.

Aside from iron, string beans are also a great source of vitamin C, which, as previously mentioned, helps with the absorption of iron. 

So, your body will get a lot more non-heme iron from string beans than it would have otherwise.

In addition, string beans contain a good dose of fiber, which means that eating them improves your digestion. 

They also provide you with a good dose of vitamin A, vitamin K, folate, manganese, and magnesium.

Consuming this veggie can be beneficial for your health.

7. Red cabbage

One cup of cooked red cabbage contains about 1 mg of iron, which is a very good amount. On the other hand, if you choose regular cabbage, you’ll only get about 0.2 mg of iron in the same serving. So, it’s best to choose red cabbage for its iron content.

Cabbage also contains a lot of vitamin C, folate, and some copper, which are all nutrients that help prevent anemia and iron deficiency. As a result, you’ll be getting a lot more from eating cabbage than just iron.

In addition, cabbage tends to be high in fiber, antioxidants, vitamin K, vitamin B6, manganese, and potassium.

8. Spinach

Spinach smoothie drink
Spinach smoothie drink

One cup of cooked spinach provides you with 6.4 mg of iron36% of your daily need for this nutrient

If you eat it raw, the same serving contains 0.8 mg of iron. But remember that spinach loses lots of water during cooking, do the weight also changes.

Because of that, both raw and cooked spinach is rich in iron.

Other nutrients found in spinach include vitamins A, C, and K, folate, manganese, and magnesium.

Spinach is also an excellent source of various antioxidants, which help flush out free radicals from your body and reduce your risk of several chronic conditions.

9. Mushrooms

Generally, mushrooms are considered fungi, but they’re consumed as vegetables, so they have a place on this list as well. 

One cup of cooked mushrooms contains 2.7 mg of iron, which is around 15% of your daily requirement for this micronutrient.

This amount mostly applies to white mushrooms and not many other kinds. So, if you want to add more iron-rich foods to your diet, choose white mushrooms.

White mushrooms are also a pretty good source of fiber, vitamin C, riboflavin, niacin, pantothenic acid, potassium, and copper.

Vitamin C and copper are both nutrients essential for the health of your cardiovascular system, the production of red blood cells, and anemia prevention.

So, eating mushrooms is good for your overall health and well-being.

10. Asparagus

Green asparagus salad
Green asparagus salad

A one-cup serving of cooked asparagus contains around 1.6 mg of iron10% of your daily need

This is a pretty good amount considering the calories and other essential nutrients, making asparagus a wonderful way to load up on iron.

Asparagus also comes with other nutrients like vitamins A, C, and K, thiamin, and folate, as well as many important minerals.

In addition, studies show that eating asparagus helps improve the health of your kidneys, weight loss, improved digestion, lower blood pressure, and healthy pregnancy outcomes.

On top of that, if you like canned asparagus, you can also include it in your diet. A one-cup serving of canned asparagus contains 4.4 mg of iron, which equals 25% of your daily need for this mineral.

11. Collards

One cup of cooked collard contains around 2.2 mg of iron, about 12% of your daily need for this mineral

As a result, collards make for an excellent leafy green for loading up on iron and preventing anemia.

What’s more, collards contain a lot of calcium, vitamins A, C, and K, magnesium, and manganese.

So, adding some collards to salads and other meals is a great idea for optimal health. 

12. Lentils

Lentil soup
Lentil soup

One cup of cooked lentils contains 6.6 mg of iron, which is 37% of your daily need for this mineral. 

While lentils aren’t genetically categorized as vegetables, they’re still often listed along with other iron-rich veggies.

Lentils are also a fantastic source of fiber, protein, and powerful plant compounds that improve your health. These nutrients and plant compounds are essential for the health of your digestive system and other bodily processes.

Eating lentils can also help you load up on various B vitamins, magnesium, phosphorus, copper, and zinc.

So, by eating lentils, you can avoid various mineral deficiencies.

13. Leeks

Leek soup
A one-cup serving of cooked leeks contains 1.2 mg of iron

A one-cup serving of cooked leeks contains 1.2 mg of iron8% of your daily requirement. This serving comes with just about 32 calories, which makes leeks a wonderful source of iron.

Leeks also contain a good dose of vitamin C, manganese, vitamin A, and folate. All of these nutrients are essential for good health and well-being.

In addition, studies show that leeks improve digestion, promote weight loss, reduce inflammation, and combat certain types of cancer.

As a result, it’s beneficial to include them in a healthy, balanced diet.

14. Artichokes

One cup of cooked artichokes contains 1 mg of iron, which is a pretty good amount for such a small serving. 

Because of that, including artichokes in a diet aimed at increasing your iron intake is a great idea.

This veggie also contains a lot of vitamin C, vitamin K, fiber, folate, manganese, and magnesium.

Plus, according to studies, eating artichokes can help regulate your blood pressure, improve blood sugar levels, and ease the symptoms of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS).

As a result, it’s a good idea to consume this veggie from time to time.

15. Kale

Kale and avocado sushi roll
Kale and avocado sushi roll

One cup of raw kale contains 1.1 mg of iron, and one cup of cooked kale contains 1.2 mg of iron. So, consuming both raw and cooked kale is a wonderful choice for upping your intake of this mineral.

What’s more, kale contains a wonderful amount of vitamins A, C, and K, as well as vitamin B6. It also provides you with a good dose of calcium, copper, and manganese, on top of lots of powerful antioxidants.

The vitamin C and copper found in kale also improve iron absorption, reducing your risk of various cardiovascular conditions. So, make sure to include kale in your diet.

16. Beets

A one-cup serving of cooked beets contains 1.4 mg of iron – 8% of your daily need for this mineral

Because of this amount and very few calories, beets are an excellent source of iron, aiding in the prevention of iron deficiency.

Beets also contain nutrients that aid in iron absorption, such as vitamin C and copper.

On top of that, beets provide you with a lot of vitamin A, vitamin K, vitamin B6, calcium, manganese, and potassium. 

Several studies show that including beets in your diet can help fight inflammation and support brain health.

17. Beet greens

Lush beet greens
Lush beet greens

One cup of raw beet greens contains around 1 mg of iron, whereas one cup of cooked beet greens provides you with 2.7 mg of iron. So, eating a serving of beet greens can help you get as much as 15% of your daily need for iron.

Beet greens are also a great source of vitamins A, C, E, and K, as well as vitamin B6, thiamin, and folate. 

In addition, they also provide you with a good amount of calcium, magnesium, potassium, manganese, and copper.

So, aside from being high in iron, beet greens contain a lot of other beneficial nutrients.

18. Dandelion greens

Dandelion greens salad
One cup of dandelion greens contains 1.9 mg of iron

One cup of dandelion greens contains 1.9 mg of ironabout 10% of your daily recommended need for this micronutrient. This amount of iron comes with just 35 calories, making this leafy green a wonderful source of this important mineral.

Other nutrients found in dandelion greens include vitamin A, vitamin C, vitamin K, riboflavin, calcium, and manganese. 

According to research, dandelion greens can reduce inflammation, manage blood pressure, and lower cholesterol levels.

As a result, it’s safe to include dandelion greens in a healthy, balanced diet aimed at increasing your iron intake.

19. Kidney beans

One cup of canned kidney beans contains about 3 mg of iron, which equals 17% of your daily requirement. In fact, all types of beans are a great source of this mineral. So, you can alternate between all of them.

What’s more, kidney beans are a perfect source of vitamin K, thiamin, folate, and lots of essential minerals. 

Plus, they contain a lot of fiber and protein – two nutrients that help improve the health of your digestive system.

So, eating kidney beans is good, not just for their iron content.

20. Chard

Chard
Eating one serving of cooked chard can help you get as much as 22% of your daily need for iron.

A one-cup serving of raw chard provides you with 0.6 mg of iron, and one cup of cooked chard contains 4 mg of iron

So, eating one serving of cooked chard can help you get as much as 22% of your daily need for this mineral.

Because of that, eating chard is great for preventing iron deficiency.

In addition, chard contains many other nutrients. In fact, it’s rich in vitamin K, vitamin A, magnesium, potassium, and manganese. 

It’s also loaded with powerful antioxidants, so you’re less likely to develop various severe health conditions.

Conclusion: Vegetables High In Iron

As you can see, there are many healthy veggies that are rich in iron. Because of that, eating the vegetables mentioned above can help you prevent iron deficiency, anemia, and various cardiovascular health issues.

In addition, iron isn’t the only nutrient that eating these veggies can help you load up on. 

They’re also high in fiber, vitamins, minerals, and antioxidants – all of which work together to help you reduce your risk of severe health conditions.

So, eating these vegetables is a great choice, not just for their iron content.

Sources: Nutrition Data, PMC, Research Gate, and National Library of Medicine